Mon, 18 Apr 2011 16:56:09 GMT | By Tamara Hinson, contributor, MSN Travel
The world’s most stunning bridges

Qingdao Haiwan Bridge, China



Qingdao Haiwan Bridge, China
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China's record-breaking new sea bridge is not only, at 26.4 miles, longer than the course of a marathon, it is also reassuringly sturdy for something so exposed to the elements. The bridge has been built to withstand earthquakes of up to 8 on the Richter scale, along with hurricanes and typhoons up to 125mph. Construction costs totalled $8.5 billion (£5 billion), and it's expected that 35,000 cars will cross it every day when it opens to the public late this year.

Disappointingly no doubt for its engineers, the bridge will hold its record until only 2016, the expected completion date of a 30 mile bridge linking China's southern province of Guangdong province with Hong Kong and Macau.

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The world’s most stunning bridgesVisit these 'show-off' pieces of engineering on your travels - they'll restore your faith in human brilliance and pluckTamara Hinsoncontributor, MSN Travel2011-04-18T16:56:09As perhaps yet another sign of its race to become the leading global superpower, China earlier this year unveiled the world's longest sea bridge - a positively packed-lunch-requiring 26-mile-long structure linking two urban coastal areas in the north of the country. The bridge, five miles longer than the distance between Dover and Calais, beats the previous record-holder, the Lake Pontchartrain Causeway in Louisiana, by almost three miles.Bridges have always been a method par excellence for a civilisation to show off. Not that there's necessarily anything wrong with that: such muscle-baring engineering displays can also lead to great leaps and bounds in technology for the benefit of humankind. Here we show you some of the most impressive - and, yes, show-offy - bridges of all to tick off on your travels.trueThe world's 50 most beautiful things50 places to see before you die30 historic sites to see before you dieBlog: follow the world's toughest female adventurer as she slogs around the planetWatch: extreme bungee in South KoreaQingdao Haiwan Bridge, ChinaChina's record-breaking new sea bridge is not only, at 26.4 miles, longer than the course of a marathon, it is also reassuringly sturdy for something so exposed to the elements. The bridge has been built to withstand earthquakes of up to 8 on the Richter scale, along with hurricanes and typhoons up to 125mph. Construction costs totalled $8.5 billion (£5 billion), and it's expected that 35,000 cars will cross it every day when it opens to the public late this year.Disappointingly no doubt for its engineers, the bridge will hold its record until only 2016, the expected completion date of a 30 mile bridge linking China's southern province of Guangdong province with Hong Kong and Macau. topThis field has been disabled for Gallery V2Qingdao Haiwan Bridge, ChinaQingdao Haiwan Bridge, ChinaQingdao Haiwan Bridge, ChinaQingdao Haiwan Bridge, ChinaQingdao Haiwan Bridge, ChinaQingdao Haiwan Bridge, ChinaQingdao Haiwan Bridge, ChinaQingdao Haiwan Bridge, ChinaQingdao Haiwan Bridge, ChinaQingdao Haiwan Bridge, ChinaQingdao Haiwan Bridge, ChinaQingdao Haiwan Bridge, ChinaQingdao Haiwan Bridge, ChinaQingdao Haiwan Bridge, ChinaQingdao Haiwan Bridge, ChinaQingdao Haiwan Bridge, ChinaQingdao Haiwan Bridge, ChinaQingdao Haiwan Bridge, ChinaQingdao Haiwan Bridge, ChinaQingdao Haiwan Bridge, ChinaQingdao Haiwan Bridge, ChinaQingdao Haiwan Bridge, ChinaQingdao Haiwan Bridge, ChinaQingdao Haiwan Bridge, ChinaQingdao Haiwan Bridge, ChinaQingdao Haiwan Bridge, ChinaQingdao Haiwan Bridge, ChinaQingdao Haiwan Bridge, ChinaQingdao Haiwan Bridge, ChinaQingdao Haiwan Bridge, ChinaQingdao Haiwan Bridge, ChinaQingdao Haiwan Bridge, ChinaQingdao Haiwan Bridge, ChinaQingdao Haiwan Bridge, ChinaQingdao Haiwan Bridge, ChinaQingdao Haiwan Bridge, ChinaQingdao Haiwan Bridge, ChinaQingdao Haiwan Bridge, ChinaQingdao Haiwan Bridge, ChinaQingdao Haiwan Bridge, ChinaQingdao Haiwan Bridge, ChinaQingdao Haiwan Bridge, ChinaQingdao Haiwan Bridge, ChinaQingdao Haiwan Bridge, ChinaQingdao Haiwan Bridge, ChinaQingdao Haiwan Bridge, ChinaQingdao Haiwan Bridge, ChinaQingdao Haiwan Bridge, ChinaQingdao Haiwan Bridge, ChinaQingdao Haiwan Bridge, ChinaQingdao Haiwan Bridge, ChinaQingdao Haiwan Bridge, ChinaLake Pontchartrain Causeway, LouisianaWith a length of 23 miles (37,014 metres), the Lake Pontchartrain Causeway is the fifth longest bridge - and now the second longest sea bridge - in the world. The causeway, which is supported by 9,500 pillars, has been hit by boats on several occasions. The most serious incident took place in June 1964, when a tugboat pushing two barges collided with the bridge, leading to the collapse of four spans - which in turn caused a bus to crash off the road deck and into the lake. However, the bridge is one of the few causeways in the world not to have been damaged by hurricanes or other natural calamities.topThis field has been disabled for Gallery V2Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, Louisiana(©PA)Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, Louisiana(©PA)Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, Louisiana(©PA)Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, Louisiana(©PA)Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, Louisiana(©PA)Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, Louisiana(©PA)Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, Louisiana(©PA)Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, Louisiana(©PA)Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, Louisiana(©PA)Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, Louisiana(©PA)Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, Louisiana(©PA)Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, Louisiana(©PA)Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, Louisiana(©PA)Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, Louisiana(©PA)Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, Louisiana(©PA)Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, Louisiana(©PA)Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, Louisiana(©PA)Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, Louisiana(©PA)Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, Louisiana(©PA)Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, Louisiana(©PA)Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, Louisiana(©PA)Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, Louisiana(©PA)Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, Louisiana(©PA)Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, Louisiana(©PA)Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, Louisiana(©PA)Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, Louisiana(©PA)Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, Louisiana(©PA)Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, Louisiana(©PA)Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, Louisiana(©PA)Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, Louisiana(©PA)Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, Louisiana(©PA)Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, Louisiana(©PA)Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, Louisiana(©PA)Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, Louisiana(©PA)Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, Louisiana(©PA)Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, Louisiana(©PA)Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, Louisiana(©PA)Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, Louisiana(©PA)Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, Louisiana(©PA)Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, Louisiana(©PA)Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, Louisiana(©PA)Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, Louisiana(©PA)Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, Louisiana(©PA)Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, Louisiana(©PA)Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, Louisiana(©PA)Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, Louisiana(©PA)Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, Louisiana(©PA)Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, Louisiana(©PA)Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, Louisiana(©PA)Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, Louisiana(©PA)Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, Louisiana(©PA)Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, Louisiana(©PA)Confederation Bridge, CanadaThe eight mile (12,874 metres) Confederation Bridge is the longest in the world to span ice-covered water. There was some concern, in the late 1980s, when it was proposed that the ferry service linking Prince Edward Island to New Brunswick would be replaced with a bridge but, when Prince Edward islanders were asked to vote on the matter, 59% were in favour.Construction took four years and involved 5,000 local workers. In the year after completion, visitor numbers to the island increased by 460,000. topThis field has been disabled for Gallery V2Confederation Bridge, Canada(©Prince Edward Island Tourism & Culture)Confederation Bridge, Canada(©Prince Edward Island Tourism & Culture)Confederation Bridge, Canada(©Prince Edward Island Tourism & Culture)Confederation Bridge, Canada(©Prince Edward Island Tourism & Culture)Confederation Bridge, Canada(©Prince Edward Island Tourism & Culture)Confederation Bridge, Canada(©Prince Edward Island Tourism & Culture)Confederation Bridge, Canada(©Prince Edward Island Tourism & Culture)Confederation Bridge, Canada(©Prince Edward Island Tourism & Culture)Confederation Bridge, Canada(©Prince Edward Island Tourism & Culture)Oresund Bridge, Denmark/SwedenWhile it's not unusual for a bridge to break multiple records, it's the nature of the records held by the Oresund Bridge, in Scandanavia, that are most impressive - it is both the longest road and rail bridge in Europe and includes the longest underwater rail and road tunnel, with a total length of just under five miles (7,845 metres).The reason for the double whammy is that, halfway across the Oresund Strait, the bridge disappears underwater. Engineers decided to create an underwater section for the second half of the strait for several reasons: first, the close proximity of Copenhagen airport led to pilots expressing concern that a raised second half of the bridge could interfere with flight paths, and second, the underwater section meant that icebergs could pass down the river without getting lodged within the bridge supports and blocking the strait.topThis field has been disabled for Gallery V2Oresund Bridge, Denmark/Sweden(©Jorgen Schytte and Billeder Visit Denmark)Oresund Bridge, Denmark/Sweden(©Jorgen Schytte and Billeder Visit Denmark)Oresund Bridge, Denmark/Sweden(©Jorgen Schytte and Billeder Visit Denmark)Oresund Bridge, Denmark/Sweden(©Jorgen Schytte and Billeder Visit Denmark)Oresund Bridge, Denmark/Sweden(©Jorgen Schytte and Billeder Visit Denmark)Oresund Bridge, Denmark/Sweden(©Jorgen Schytte and Billeder Visit Denmark)Oresund Bridge, Denmark/Sweden(©Jorgen Schytte and Billeder Visit Denmark)Oresund Bridge, Denmark/Sweden(©Jorgen Schytte and Billeder Visit Denmark)Oresund Bridge, Denmark/Sweden(©Jorgen Schytte and Billeder Visit Denmark)Akashi-Kaikyo Suspension Bridge, Kobe, JapanIt took two million people more than 10 years to build the six-lane, 3,911 metre (12,831 ft) Akashi-Kaikyo Suspension Bridge. This, the world's longest suspension bridge, contains more than 1.4 million cubic metres of concrete and the length of cable it uses would circle the world seven times.The bridge's engineers had their work cut out - winds in the typhoon-plagued region regularly exceed 290kph. Holding the structure in place are two anchor blocks, weighing 350,000 tonnes each, at either end. Such precautions have paid off: the bridge survived the devastating earthquake and tsunami of last month, as well as the 1995 Kobe quake, which measured 7.2 on the Richter scale and lasted for more than 20 seconds - although, in the latter case, the bridge had to be lengthened after it was discovered the two central towers had shifted by three feet. topThis field has been disabled for Gallery V2Akashi-Kaikyo Suspension Bridge, Kobe, Japan(©Rex)Akashi-Kaikyo Suspension Bridge, Kobe, Japan(©Rex)Akashi-Kaikyo Suspension Bridge, Kobe, Japan(©Rex)Akashi-Kaikyo Suspension Bridge, Kobe, Japan(©Rex)Akashi-Kaikyo Suspension Bridge, Kobe, Japan(©Rex)Akashi-Kaikyo Suspension Bridge, Kobe, Japan(©Rex)Akashi-Kaikyo Suspension Bridge, Kobe, Japan(©Rex)Akashi-Kaikyo Suspension Bridge, Kobe, Japan(©Rex)Akashi-Kaikyo Suspension Bridge, Kobe, Japan(©Rex)Millau Viaduct, southern FranceThe Millau Viaduct is the creation of the ubiquitous British architect Sir Norman Foster, who joined forces with the engineering firm Eiffage TP to create the 2,460 metre (8,071 ft) long structure. The bridge has the tallest pylons in the world, measuring 244.96 metres (803 ft) at their highest point; the road deck, which sits 270 metres (890 ft) above the Tarn River, is also the highest in Europe and the longest cable-stayed deck in the world. topThis field has been disabled for Gallery V2Millau Viaduct, southern France(©Foster and Partners)Millau Viaduct, southern France(©Foster and Partners)Millau Viaduct, southern France(©Foster and Partners)Millau Viaduct, southern France(©Foster and Partners)Millau Viaduct, southern France(©Foster and Partners)Millau Viaduct, southern France(©Foster and Partners)Millau Viaduct, southern France(©Foster and Partners)Millau Viaduct, southern France(©Foster and Partners)Millau Viaduct, southern France(©Foster and Partners)Bosphorus Bridge, IstanbulThe 1,510 metre (4,954 ft) Bosphorus bridge connects two continents, Asia and Europe, linking Ortakoy (on the European side) and Beylerbeyi (on the Asian side). The bridge is the 16th longest suspension bridge in the world, although it was fourth longest when constructed in 1973 - by two British engineers, Sir Gilbert Roberts and William Brown, who also built the Humber, Severn and Forth Road bridges in their home country.Surprisingly, the bridge isn't actually the first to connect the two continents - in 480BC, the Persian king Xerxes I built a pontoon bridge connecting Europe and Asia across the Hellespont strait (now known as the Dardanelles).topThis field has been disabled for Gallery V2Bosphorus Bridge, Istanbul(©LP-Izzet Keribar)Bosphorus Bridge, Istanbul(©LP-Izzet Keribar)Bosphorus Bridge, Istanbul(©LP-Izzet Keribar)Bosphorus Bridge, Istanbul(©LP-Izzet Keribar)Bosphorus Bridge, Istanbul(©LP-Izzet Keribar)Bosphorus Bridge, Istanbul(©LP-Izzet Keribar)Bosphorus Bridge, Istanbul(©LP-Izzet Keribar)Bosphorus Bridge, Istanbul(©LP-Izzet Keribar)Bosphorus Bridge, Istanbul(©LP-Izzet Keribar)Tsing Ma Bridge, Hong KongWith a length of 2,160 metres (7,086 ft), the Tsing Ma Bridge is the world's longest road and rail suspension bridge, linking Hong Kong with Lantau Island and the international airport. The bridge consists of a six lane roadway, two railway lines and two enclosed roadways beneath - allowing traffic to continue using the bridge in the event of a typhoon, although we can't help but think that a bridge is the last place you'd want to be in the middle of a typhoon, no matter how enclosed it is. topThis field has been disabled for Gallery V2Tsing Ma Bridge, Hong Kong(©Discover Hong Kong)Tsing Ma Bridge, Hong Kong(©Discover Hong Kong)Tsing Ma Bridge, Hong Kong(©Discover Hong Kong)Tsing Ma Bridge, Hong Kong(©Discover Hong Kong)Tsing Ma Bridge, Hong Kong(©Discover Hong Kong)Tsing Ma Bridge, Hong Kong(©Discover Hong Kong)Tsing Ma Bridge, Hong Kong(©Discover Hong Kong)Tsing Ma Bridge, Hong Kong(©Discover Hong Kong)Tsing Ma Bridge, Hong Kong(©Discover Hong Kong)Puente Nuevo, Andalucia, SpainIf you thought a 10-year construction period sounds a little long, prepare to be amazed - Spain's Puente Nuevo Bridge took a staggering 42 years to build. Construction started in 1751, under the architect José Martín de Aldehuela, who also built the Plaza de Toros de Ronda, in Málaga - the oldest bullring still in use. During the Spanish civil war (1936 to 1939) a chamber below the central arch was used by both sides as a prison for captured opponents, although those held there were the lucky ones - many were simply thrown over the side into the El Tajo canyon 110 metres below. topThis field has been disabled for Gallery V2Puente Nuevo, Andalucia, Spain(©Www.turismoderonda)Puente Nuevo, Andalucia, Spain(©Www.turismoderonda)Puente Nuevo, Andalucia, Spain(©Www.turismoderonda)Puente Nuevo, Andalucia, Spain(©Www.turismoderonda)Puente Nuevo, Andalucia, Spain(©Www.turismoderonda)Puente Nuevo, Andalucia, Spain(©Www.turismoderonda)Puente Nuevo, Andalucia, Spain(©Www.turismoderonda)Puente Nuevo, Andalucia, Spain(©Www.turismoderonda)Puente Nuevo, Andalucia, Spain(©Www.turismoderonda)The Helix Bridge, SingaporeA DNA strand mightn't be the first thing that comes to mind when you think about designing a bridge but it was nonetheless the inspiration for this pedestrian bridge in Singapore. The bridge, which opened in 2010, becomes particularly spectacular at night, when the whole structure is illuminated. It includes in its design two giant pairs of letters - c and g, a and t - which represent cytosine, guanine, adenine and thymine, the four bases of DNA. topThis field has been disabled for Gallery V2The Helix Bridge, Singapore(©Singapore Tourism Board)The Helix Bridge, Singapore(©Singapore Tourism Board)The Helix Bridge, Singapore(©Singapore Tourism Board)The Helix Bridge, Singapore(©Singapore Tourism Board)The Helix Bridge, Singapore(©Singapore Tourism Board)The Helix Bridge, Singapore(©Singapore Tourism Board)The Helix Bridge, Singapore(©Singapore Tourism Board)The Helix Bridge, Singapore(©Singapore Tourism Board)The Helix Bridge, Singapore(©Singapore Tourism Board)Langkawi Sky Bridge, MalaysiaVertigo-sufferers might want to steer clear of the Langkawi Sky Bridge, which curves around a mountain peak on the island of Pulau Langkawi in the Malaysian Langkawi archipelago. The 125-metre curved walkway, which sits 700 metres above sea level, affords spectacular views of the Andaman Sea and the Thai island of Tarutao.Particularly impressive is that, while both ends of the bridge rest on the hillside, the main structure is supported by one single, central pylon. topThis field has been disabled for Gallery V2Langkawi Sky Bridge, Malaysia(©Imagegallery.tourism.gov.my)Langkawi Sky Bridge, Malaysia(©Imagegallery.tourism.gov.my)Langkawi Sky Bridge, Malaysia(©Imagegallery.tourism.gov.my)Langkawi Sky Bridge, Malaysia(©Imagegallery.tourism.gov.my)Langkawi Sky Bridge, Malaysia(©Imagegallery.tourism.gov.my)Langkawi Sky Bridge, Malaysia(©Imagegallery.tourism.gov.my)Langkawi Sky Bridge, Malaysia(©Imagegallery.tourism.gov.my)Langkawi Sky Bridge, Malaysia(©Imagegallery.tourism.gov.my)Langkawi Sky Bridge, Malaysia(©Imagegallery.tourism.gov.my)Natchez Trace Parkway Bridge, Tennessee, USThe Natchez Trace Parkway Bridge is unique in that its entire weight rests on the crowns of two arches, something the engineers implemented in order to allow unobstructed views of the valley beyond. The structure is America's first segmentally constructed bridge - in other words, the parts were constructed elsewhere then moved into place. In this case, 122 individual segments, each weighing around 26 tonnes, were pre-cast in nearby Franklin, before being installed.topThis field has been disabled for Gallery V2Natchez Trace Parkway Bridge, Tennessee, US(©Vistmusiccity.com)Natchez Trace Parkway Bridge, Tennessee, US(©Vistmusiccity.com)Natchez Trace Parkway Bridge, Tennessee, US(©Vistmusiccity.com)Natchez Trace Parkway Bridge, Tennessee, US(©Vistmusiccity.com)Natchez Trace Parkway Bridge, Tennessee, US(©Vistmusiccity.com)Natchez Trace Parkway Bridge, Tennessee, US(©Vistmusiccity.com)Natchez Trace Parkway Bridge, Tennessee, US(©Vistmusiccity.com)Natchez Trace Parkway Bridge, Tennessee, US(©Vistmusiccity.com)Natchez Trace Parkway Bridge, Tennessee, US(©Vistmusiccity.com)Ponte Vecchio Bridge, Florence, ItalyThis ancient bridge, built in AD 972, is Europe's oldest to be constructed entirely from stone. The structure was originally made from wood but rebuilt in the stronger material after being destroyed by floods in 1333.In its heyday, the different levels were home to jewellers and goldsmiths. More recently, however, Ponte Vecchio's popularity as a hotspot for courting couples has caused problems. For centuries, couples have sealed their love by attaching a padlock to the bridge and throwing the key into the water below, believing that doing so will bond the lovers together for life. Now, thousands of padlocks have to be removed from the railings of the bridge every year. The cost of doing so has become so great that anyone caught attaching a lock faces a €50 (£44) fine.topThis field has been disabled for Gallery V2Ponte Vecchio Bridge, Florence, Italy(©Www.firenzeturismo)Ponte Vecchio Bridge, Florence, Italy(©Www.firenzeturismo)Ponte Vecchio Bridge, Florence, Italy(©Www.firenzeturismo)Ponte Vecchio Bridge, Florence, Italy(©Www.firenzeturismo)Ponte Vecchio Bridge, Florence, Italy(©Www.firenzeturismo)Ponte Vecchio Bridge, Florence, Italy(©Www.firenzeturismo)Ponte Vecchio Bridge, Florence, Italy(©Www.firenzeturismo)Ponte Vecchio Bridge, Florence, Italy(©Www.firenzeturismo)Ponte Vecchio Bridge, Florence, Italy(©Www.firenzeturismo)Erasmus Bridge, Rotterdam, NetherlandsWhat the Erasmus Bridge lacks in length, it makes up for in style. The structure is meant to represent the joining of the two parts of the city that it links - probably a good thing, seeing as that's exactly what a bridge is meant to do. Shortly after the bridge was built, additional shock dampers had to be installed after it was discovered that the whole structure would swing significantly in strong winds. (Ring any bells, London?)The bridge's graceful design led to its nickname of the Swan, and it now forms part of Rotterdam's official logo. leftThis field has been disabled for Gallery V2Erasmus Bridge, Rotterdam, Netherlands(©Hannah Anthonysz and Rotterdam Imagebank)Erasmus Bridge, Rotterdam, Netherlands(©Hannah Anthonysz and Rotterdam Imagebank)Erasmus Bridge, Rotterdam, Netherlands(©Hannah Anthonysz and Rotterdam Imagebank)Erasmus Bridge, Rotterdam, Netherlands(©Hannah Anthonysz and Rotterdam Imagebank)Erasmus Bridge, Rotterdam, Netherlands(©Hannah Anthonysz and Rotterdam Imagebank)Erasmus Bridge, Rotterdam, Netherlands(©Hannah Anthonysz and Rotterdam Imagebank)Erasmus Bridge, Rotterdam, Netherlands(©Hannah Anthonysz and Rotterdam Imagebank)Erasmus Bridge, Rotterdam, Netherlands(©Hannah Anthonysz and Rotterdam Imagebank)Erasmus Bridge, Rotterdam, Netherlands(©Hannah Anthonysz and Rotterdam Imagebank)Royal Gorge Bridge, ColoradoConnecting two sides of a gorge 291 metres above the Arkansas River, Colorado's stupendous Royal Gorge Bridge held the world record for the highest bridge of any type for an estimable 74 years, between the year of its construction, 1929, and 2003, when it was surpassed by China's Beipanjiang bridge.In October 2003, the bridge made the headlines again, when Australian "wingsuiter" Dwain Weston attempted to fly over it, wearing only a special skydiving suit. Unfortunately, Weston miscalculated the distance, hitting a railing at over 100mph and dying instantly. topThis field has been disabled for Gallery V2Royal Gorge Bridge, Colorado(©Royal Gorge Bridge & Park)Royal Gorge Bridge, Colorado(©Royal Gorge Bridge & Park)Royal Gorge Bridge, Colorado(©Royal Gorge Bridge & Park)Royal Gorge Bridge, Colorado(©Royal Gorge Bridge & Park)Royal Gorge Bridge, Colorado(©Royal Gorge Bridge & Park)Royal Gorge Bridge, Colorado(©Royal Gorge Bridge & Park)Royal Gorge Bridge, Colorado(©Royal Gorge Bridge & Park)Royal Gorge Bridge, Colorado(©Royal Gorge Bridge & Park)Royal Gorge Bridge, Colorado(©Royal Gorge Bridge & Park)Alamillo Bridge, Seville, SpainAs with the similarly shaped Erasmus Bridge, in Rotterdam, symbolism is a fundamental part of the design here. To an observer the Spanish bridge might resemble an elegent, upended harp, but it is officially meant to represent industrial society and the aspirations of the city's residents. The striking slanting angle of the main pylon is intended to give the bridge a feeling of motion.The 250 metre (820ft) structure - constructed as part of efforts to improve the city in the run up to Expo 92 - consists of a single pylon, counterbalanced by 13 stretches of cable (so one to avoid if you're superstitious). topThis field has been disabled for Gallery V2Alamillo Bridge, Seville, Spain(©Sevilla Ciudad)Alamillo Bridge, Seville, Spain(©Sevilla Ciudad)Alamillo Bridge, Seville, Spain(©Sevilla Ciudad)Alamillo Bridge, Seville, Spain(©Sevilla Ciudad)Alamillo Bridge, Seville, Spain(©Sevilla Ciudad)Alamillo Bridge, Seville, Spain(©Sevilla Ciudad)Alamillo Bridge, Seville, Spain(©Sevilla Ciudad)Alamillo Bridge, Seville, Spain(©Sevilla Ciudad)Alamillo Bridge, Seville, Spain(©Sevilla Ciudad)Pont du Gard Aqueduct, southern FranceProof that the Romans knew a thing or two about construction comes in the form of the Pont du Gard Aqueduct, in southern France. Constructed in the 1st century, the bridge comprises three rows of arches and once carried 200,000,000 litres of water a day to the citizens of Nimes. Although it is thought the aqueduct was still being used as late as the ninth century, lack of maintenance after the fourth century saw the structure become increasingly clogged by mineral deposits, although visitors can still take guided tours across it.topThis field has been disabled for Gallery V2Pont du Gard Aqueduct, Southern France(©Yann de Fareins)Pont du Gard Aqueduct, Southern France(©Yann de Fareins)Pont du Gard Aqueduct, Southern France(©Yann de Fareins)Pont du Gard Aqueduct, Southern France(©Yann de Fareins)Pont du Gard Aqueduct, Southern France(©Yann de Fareins)Pont du Gard Aqueduct, Southern France(©Yann de Fareins)Pont du Gard Aqueduct, Southern France(©Yann de Fareins)Pont du Gard Aqueduct, Southern France(©Yann de Fareins)Pont du Gard Aqueduct, Southern France(©Yann de Fareins)Henderson Waves Bridge, SingaporeNotable for its incredible undulating structure and the warmth of its construction materials, Henderson Waves Bridge also offers stunning views of the city. The structure comprises a series of curved steel ribs, while slats of native balau wood used for the decking give the bridge its colour. At night, clever lighting bestows a luminescent appearance on the bridge, although the curving design could well lead to a serious bout of dizziness in anyone who overindulged in the evening.topThis field has been disabled for Gallery V2Henderson Waves Bridge, Singapore(©Singapore Tourism Board/Wong-Chek Poh)Henderson Waves Bridge, Singapore(©Singapore Tourism Board/Wong-Chek Poh)Henderson Waves Bridge, Singapore(©Singapore Tourism Board/Wong-Chek Poh)Henderson Waves Bridge, Singapore(©Singapore Tourism Board/Wong-Chek Poh)Henderson Waves Bridge, Singapore(©Singapore Tourism Board/Wong-Chek Poh)Henderson Waves Bridge, Singapore(©Singapore Tourism Board/Wong-Chek Poh)Henderson Waves Bridge, Singapore(©Singapore Tourism Board/Wong-Chek Poh)Henderson Waves Bridge, Singapore(©Singapore Tourism Board/Wong-Chek Poh)Henderson Waves Bridge, Singapore(©Singapore Tourism Board/Wong-Chek Poh)The Kapellbrücke (Chapel Bridge) Lucerne, SwitzerlandIn a world where bridge engineers compete to build the highest, longest and tallest bridges, there's something paradoxically refreshing about this medieval Swiss bridge. Constructed in 1333, originally designed to help protect Lucerne from attack, the Kapellbrücke is the oldest covered wooden bridge in Europe.The bridge is also Switzerland's most photographed structure and one of the first examples of a multi-purpose bridge, serving as a torture chamber, prison, watchtower and treasury.topThis field has been disabled for Gallery V2The Kapellbrücke (Chapel Bridge) Lucerne, Switzerland(©Luzern Tourismus)The Kapellbrücke (Chapel Bridge) Lucerne, Switzerland(©Luzern Tourismus)The Kapellbrücke (Chapel Bridge) Lucerne, Switzerland(©Luzern Tourismus)The Kapellbrücke (Chapel Bridge) Lucerne, Switzerland(©Luzern Tourismus)The Kapellbrücke (Chapel Bridge) Lucerne, Switzerland(©Luzern Tourismus)The Kapellbrücke (Chapel Bridge) Lucerne, Switzerland(©Luzern Tourismus)The Kapellbrücke (Chapel Bridge) Lucerne, Switzerland(©Luzern Tourismus)The Kapellbrücke (Chapel Bridge) Lucerne, Switzerland(©Luzern Tourismus)The Kapellbrücke (Chapel Bridge) Lucerne, Switzerland(©Luzern Tourismus)Rolling Bridge, Paddington Basin, LondonThere's a touch of drawbridge-chic about this clever design from the modern British architect Thomas Heatherwick. The structure, which is powered by hydraulic cylinders, consists of eight sections that unfurl to form a 12 metre-long bridge across a section of water at London's Paddington Basin. When the bridge isn't in use, the structure simply curls back up until the two ends touch, forming a neat ball. The bridge was made in Littlehampton, then floated into place via the Grand Union Canal.topThis field has been disabled for Gallery V2Rolling Bridge, Paddington Basin, London(©Eve Speller)Rolling Bridge, Paddington Basin, London(©Eve Speller)Rolling Bridge, Paddington Basin, London(©Eve Speller)Rolling Bridge, Paddington Basin, London(©Eve Speller)Rolling Bridge, Paddington Basin, London(©Eve Speller)Rolling Bridge, Paddington Basin, London(©Eve Speller)Rolling Bridge, Paddington Basin, London(©Eve Speller)Rolling Bridge, Paddington Basin, London(©Eve Speller)Rolling Bridge, Paddington Basin, London(©Eve Speller)Qingdao Bridge(PA)Qingdao Bridge(PA)Qingdao Bridge(PA)Qingdao Bridge(PA)Qingdao Bridge(PA)Qingdao Bridge(PA)Qingdao Bridge(PA)Qingdao Bridge(PA)Qingdao Bridge(PA)Qingdao Bridge(PA)Qingdao Bridge(PA)Qingdao Bridge(PA)Qingdao Bridge(PA)Qingdao Bridge(PA)Qingdao Bridge(PA)Qingdao Bridge(PA)Qingdao Bridge(PA)Qingdao Bridge(PA)Qingdao Bridge(PA)Qingdao Bridge(PA)Qingdao Bridge(PA)Qingdao Bridge(PA)Qingdao Bridge(PA)Qingdao Bridge(PA)Qingdao Bridge(PA)Qingdao Bridge(PA)Qingdao Bridge(PA)Qingdao Bridge(PA)Qingdao Bridge(PA)Qingdao Bridge(PA)Qingdao Bridge(PA)Qingdao Bridge(PA)Qingdao Bridge(PA)Qingdao Bridge(PA)Qingdao Bridge(PA)Qingdao Bridge(PA)Qingdao Bridge(PA)Qingdao Bridge(PA)

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