Mon, 14 Jan 2013 09:50:11 GMT | By JD Van Zyl, contributor, MSN Travel
Most amazing natural spectacles for 2013

Naga fireballs



Naga fireballs (© Benoit Michel)
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What is it? Every year between 200 and 800 fiery orbs, ranging from small sparks to the size of basketballs, spontaneously explode from Thailand’s Mekong river before drifting off into the night sky. Known locally as bung fai paya nak (Naga Fireballs), locals believe the mysterious phenomenon is caused by the fiery breath of a mystical serpent. Some scientists ascribe it to pockets of methane gas bubbling up from the riverbed while others reckon it’s nothing more than an elaborate hoax.

Where can I see it? The Naga Fireballs occur along a 150 mile stretch of the Mekong River during full moon at the end of Buddhist Lent in October. A dedicated festival in the town of Phon Phisai is at the heart of the activity, when thousands flock to the region to witness the fireballs.

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Most amazing natural spectacles for 2013Which natural phenomena can you see in the year to come? JD Van Zylcontributor, MSN Travel2013-01-14T09:50:11trueBest nature travel destinations.Mother nature never ceases to put on a good show for us, and one of the finest scheduled for 2013 is the Aurora Borealis which is expected to be at its most dazzling as the sun enters a period of increased activity. With that in mind, we explore 11 other special, unusual and sometimes downright bizarre natural phenomena from around the globe.More on MSN Travel:  the last wild corners on EarthtopSardine run, Aurora Borealis and Catatumbo lightning(©Getty/Rex Features/Wikimedia)Sardine run, Aurora Borealis and Catatumbo lightning(©Getty/Rex Features/Wikimedia)Sardine run, Aurora Borealis and Catatumbo lightning(©Getty/Rex Features/Wikimedia)Sardine run, Aurora Borealis and Catatumbo lightning(©Getty/Rex Features/Wikimedia)Sardine run, Aurora Borealis and Catatumbo lightning(©Getty/Rex Features/Wikimedia)Sardine run, Aurora Borealis and Catatumbo lightning(©Getty/Rex Features/Wikimedia)Sardine run, Aurora Borealis and Catatumbo lightning(©Getty/Rex Features/Wikimedia)Sardine run, Aurora Borealis and Catatumbo lightning(©Getty/Rex Features/Wikimedia)Sardine run, Aurora Borealis and Catatumbo lightning(©Getty/Rex Features/Wikimedia)Sardine run, Aurora Borealis and Catatumbo lightning(©Getty/Rex Features/Wikimedia)Sardine run, Aurora Borealis and Catatumbo lightning(©Getty/Rex Features/Wikimedia)Sardine run, Aurora Borealis and Catatumbo lightning(©Getty/Rex Features/Wikimedia)Sardine run, Aurora Borealis and Catatumbo lightning(©Getty/Rex Features/Wikimedia)Sardine run, Aurora Borealis and Catatumbo lightning(©Getty/Rex Features/Wikimedia)Sardine run, Aurora Borealis and Catatumbo lightning(©Getty/Rex Features/Wikimedia)Sardine run, Aurora Borealis and Catatumbo lightning(©Getty/Rex Features/Wikimedia)Sardine run, Aurora Borealis and Catatumbo lightning(©Getty/Rex Features/Wikimedia)Sardine run, Aurora Borealis and Catatumbo lightning(©Getty/Rex Features/Wikimedia)Sardine run, Aurora Borealis and Catatumbo lightning(©Getty/Rex Features/Wikimedia)Sardine run, Aurora Borealis and Catatumbo lightning(©Getty/Rex Features/Wikimedia)Sardine run, Aurora Borealis and Catatumbo lightning(©Getty/Rex Features/Wikimedia)Sardine run, Aurora Borealis and Catatumbo lightning(©Getty/Rex Features/Wikimedia)Sardine run, Aurora Borealis and Catatumbo lightning(©Getty/Rex Features/Wikimedia)Sardine run, Aurora Borealis and Catatumbo lightning(©Getty/Rex Features/Wikimedia)Sardine run, Aurora Borealis and Catatumbo lightning(©Getty/Rex Features/Wikimedia)Sardine run, Aurora Borealis and Catatumbo lightning(©Getty/Rex Features/Wikimedia)Sardine run, Aurora Borealis and Catatumbo lightning(©Getty/Rex Features/Wikimedia)Sardine run, Aurora Borealis and Catatumbo lightning(©Getty/Rex Features/Wikimedia)Sardine run, Aurora Borealis and Catatumbo lightning(©Getty/Rex Features/Wikimedia)Sardine run, Aurora Borealis and Catatumbo lightning(©Getty/Rex Features/Wikimedia)Sardine run, Aurora Borealis and Catatumbo lightning(©Getty/Rex Features/Wikimedia)Sardine run, Aurora Borealis and Catatumbo lightning(©Getty/Rex Features/Wikimedia)Sardine run, Aurora Borealis and Catatumbo lightning(©Getty/Rex Features/Wikimedia)Sardine run, Aurora Borealis and Catatumbo lightning(©Getty/Rex Features/Wikimedia)Sardine run, Aurora Borealis and Catatumbo lightning(©Getty/Rex Features/Wikimedia)Sardine run, Aurora Borealis and Catatumbo lightning(©Getty/Rex Features/Wikimedia)Sardine run, Aurora Borealis and Catatumbo lightning(©Getty/Rex Features/Wikimedia)Sardine run, Aurora Borealis and Catatumbo lightning(©Getty/Rex Features/Wikimedia)Sardine run, Aurora Borealis and Catatumbo lightning(©Getty/Rex Features/Wikimedia)Sardine run, Aurora Borealis and Catatumbo lightning(©Getty/Rex Features/Wikimedia)Sardine run, Aurora Borealis and Catatumbo lightning(©Getty/Rex Features/Wikimedia)Sardine run, Aurora Borealis and Catatumbo lightning(©Getty/Rex Features/Wikimedia)Sardine run, Aurora Borealis and Catatumbo lightning(©Getty/Rex Features/Wikimedia)Sardine run, Aurora Borealis and Catatumbo lightning(©Getty/Rex Features/Wikimedia)Sardine run, Aurora Borealis and Catatumbo lightning(©Getty/Rex Features/Wikimedia)Sardine run, Aurora Borealis and Catatumbo lightning(©Getty/Rex Features/Wikimedia)Sardine run, Aurora Borealis and Catatumbo lightning(©Getty/Rex Features/Wikimedia)Sardine run, Aurora Borealis and Catatumbo lightning(©Getty/Rex Features/Wikimedia)Sardine run, Aurora Borealis and Catatumbo lightning(©Getty/Rex Features/Wikimedia)Sardine run, Aurora Borealis and Catatumbo lightning(©Getty/Rex Features/Wikimedia)Sardine run, Aurora Borealis and Catatumbo lightning(©Getty/Rex Features/Wikimedia)Sardine run, Aurora Borealis and Catatumbo lightning(©Getty/Rex Features/Wikimedia)Catatumbo lightningWhat is it? At Venezuela’s Catatumbo River more than half the nights are filled with an electrical storm so intense that its high voltage arch flashes three miles into the sky and is visible from 250 miles away (making it a handy navigation ally for sailors). Considered the single biggest creator of ozone in the planet, this seemingly endless cloud-to-cloud storm lights up the skies for up to 10 hours at a time and is estimated to have 1.1 million electrical discharges every year.Where can I see it? The area where the Catatumbo River feeds into Venezuela’s Maracaibo Lake experiences the most storm activity, and with around 150 nights a year filled with bright flashes of lightning, your chances of viewing it are very good.Bing: search for more about Catatumbo lightning  topNatural wonders of the earth 2013Catatumbo lightning(©Wikimedia)Catatumbo lightning(©Wikimedia)Catatumbo lightning(©Wikimedia)Catatumbo lightning(©Wikimedia)Catatumbo lightning(©Wikimedia)Catatumbo lightning(©Wikimedia)Catatumbo lightning(©Wikimedia)Catatumbo lightning(©Wikimedia)Catatumbo lightning(©Wikimedia)Catatumbo lightning(©Wikimedia)Catatumbo lightning(©Wikimedia)Catatumbo lightning(©Wikimedia)Catatumbo lightning(©Wikimedia)Catatumbo lightning(©Wikimedia)Catatumbo lightning(©Wikimedia)Catatumbo lightning(©Wikimedia)Catatumbo lightning(©Wikimedia)Catatumbo lightning(©Wikimedia)Catatumbo lightning(©Wikimedia)Catatumbo lightning(©Wikimedia)Catatumbo lightning(©Wikimedia)Catatumbo lightning(©Wikimedia)Catatumbo lightning(©Wikimedia)Catatumbo lightning(©Wikimedia)Catatumbo lightning(©Wikimedia)Catatumbo lightning(©Wikimedia)Catatumbo lightning(©Wikimedia)Catatumbo lightning(©Wikimedia)Catatumbo lightning(©Wikimedia)Catatumbo lightning(©Wikimedia)Catatumbo lightning(©Wikimedia)Catatumbo lightning(©Wikimedia)Catatumbo lightning(©Wikimedia)Catatumbo lightning(©Wikimedia)Catatumbo lightning(©Wikimedia)Catatumbo lightning(©Wikimedia)Catatumbo lightning(©Wikimedia)Catatumbo lightning(©Wikimedia)Catatumbo lightning(©Wikimedia)Catatumbo lightning(©Wikimedia)Catatumbo lightning(©Wikimedia)Catatumbo lightning(©Wikimedia)Catatumbo lightning(©Wikimedia)Catatumbo lightning(©Wikimedia)Catatumbo lightning(©Wikimedia)Catatumbo lightning(©Wikimedia)Catatumbo lightning(©Wikimedia)Catatumbo lightning(©Wikimedia)Catatumbo lightning(©Wikimedia)Catatumbo lightning(©Wikimedia)Catatumbo lightning(©Wikimedia)Catatumbo lightning(©Wikimedia)Aurora BorealisWhat is it? The northern lights of the Arctic regions have beguiled people for centuries, and this year it is predicted to be at its finest as energy output peaks during an 11-year solar cycle. Caused by the collision of particles from the sun with atmospheric gases, the Aurora Borealis’ colourful curtains of light are among the most spectacular natural phenomenon on earth and worthy of a spot on your bucket list.Where can I see it? Many towns in northern Scandinavia and Canada fall in the northern lights zone and cater specifically for viewing the Aurora Borealis. Some even offer glass igloo accommodation for the ultimate viewing experience. Crisp and clear winter skies from November to March will give you the best chance of seeing the lights, and as a general rule the further north you go the better your chances of experiencing this phenomenon.Bing: stunning images of the Aurora BorealistopAurora Borealis(©Getty)Aurora Borealis(©Getty)Aurora Borealis(©Getty)Aurora Borealis(©Getty)Aurora Borealis(©Getty)Aurora Borealis(©Getty)Aurora Borealis(©Getty)Aurora Borealis(©Getty)Aurora Borealis(©Getty)Aurora Borealis(©Getty)Aurora Borealis(©Getty)Aurora Borealis(©Getty)Aurora Borealis(©Getty)Aurora Borealis(©Getty)Aurora Borealis(©Getty)Aurora Borealis(©Getty)Aurora Borealis(©Getty)Aurora Borealis(©Getty)Aurora Borealis(©Getty)Aurora Borealis(©Getty)Aurora Borealis(©Getty)Aurora Borealis(©Getty)Aurora Borealis(©Getty)Aurora Borealis(©Getty)Aurora Borealis(©Getty)Aurora Borealis(©Getty)Aurora Borealis(©Getty)Aurora Borealis(©Getty)Aurora Borealis(©Getty)Aurora Borealis(©Getty)Aurora Borealis(©Getty)Aurora Borealis(©Getty)Aurora Borealis(©Getty)Aurora Borealis(©Getty)Aurora Borealis(©Getty)Aurora Borealis(©Getty)Aurora Borealis(©Getty)Aurora Borealis(©Getty)Aurora Borealis(©Getty)Aurora Borealis(©Getty)Aurora Borealis(©Getty)Aurora Borealis(©Getty)Aurora Borealis(©Getty)Aurora Borealis(©Getty)Aurora Borealis(©Getty)Aurora Borealis(©Getty)Aurora Borealis(©Getty)Aurora Borealis(©Getty)Aurora Borealis(©Getty)Aurora Borealis(©Getty)Aurora Borealis(©Getty)Aurora Borealis(©Getty)Glowing oceansWhat is it? When conditions are just right, ocean algae populations can explode at such a rapid pace that their sheer numbers are enough to change the colour of the water. Commonly known as red tide, the swathes of phytoplankton may not look terribly attractive during the day but at night it is an entirely different story. When agitated the algae emits a blue glow which lights up the inky ocean with an otherworldly luminescence.Where can I see it? There are only a couple of bioluminescent bays in the world, or biobays for short, and three of them are in Puerto Rico. The island’s Vieques biobay is the most brilliant on earth thanks to a very high density of phytoplankton and is best experienced from a kayak which leaves a glowing blue watery trail behind it.Bing: search for more about glowing oceanstopNatural wonders of the earth 2013Glowing oceans(©Phil Gibbs)Glowing oceans(©Phil Gibbs)Glowing oceans(©Phil Gibbs)Glowing oceans(©Phil Gibbs)Glowing oceans(©Phil Gibbs)Glowing oceans(©Phil Gibbs)Glowing oceans(©Phil Gibbs)Glowing oceans(©Phil Gibbs)Glowing oceans(©Phil Gibbs)Glowing oceans(©Phil Gibbs)Glowing oceans(©Phil Gibbs)Glowing oceans(©Phil Gibbs)Glowing oceans(©Phil Gibbs)Glowing oceans(©Phil Gibbs)Glowing oceans(©Phil Gibbs)Glowing oceans(©Phil Gibbs)Glowing oceans(©Phil Gibbs)Glowing oceans(©Phil Gibbs)Glowing oceans(©Phil Gibbs)Glowing oceans(©Phil Gibbs)Glowing oceans(©Phil Gibbs)Glowing oceans(©Phil Gibbs)Glowing oceans(©Phil Gibbs)Glowing oceans(©Phil Gibbs)Glowing oceans(©Phil Gibbs)Glowing oceans(©Phil Gibbs)Glowing oceans(©Phil Gibbs)Glowing oceans(©Phil Gibbs)Glowing oceans(©Phil Gibbs)Glowing oceans(©Phil Gibbs)Glowing oceans(©Phil Gibbs)Glowing oceans(©Phil Gibbs)Glowing oceans(©Phil Gibbs)Glowing oceans(©Phil Gibbs)Glowing oceans(©Phil Gibbs)Glowing oceans(©Phil Gibbs)Glowing oceans(©Phil Gibbs)Glowing oceans(©Phil Gibbs)Glowing oceans(©Phil Gibbs)Glowing oceans(©Phil Gibbs)Glowing oceans(©Phil Gibbs)Glowing oceans(©Phil Gibbs)Glowing oceans(©Phil Gibbs)Glowing oceans(©Phil Gibbs)Glowing oceans(©Phil Gibbs)Glowing oceans(©Phil Gibbs)Glowing oceans(©Phil Gibbs)Glowing oceans(©Phil Gibbs)Glowing oceans(©Phil Gibbs)Glowing oceans(©Phil Gibbs)Glowing oceans(©Phil Gibbs)Glowing oceans(©Phil Gibbs)Morning Glory cloudsWhat is it? One of the rarest types of meteorological phenomena, Morning Glory clouds are special tube-shaped roll clouds which can stretch for hundreds of miles. Formed when a breeze from the land meets one blowing in from the ocean, the clouds appear in the morning (often just a few hundred metres from the ground), and lasts while the air above the cloud is cooler than that below it.Where can I see it? Although Morning Glory clouds have been spotted at various locations across the globe, the only place where they can be seen on a regular basis and predicted with reasonable accuracy is the Gulf of Carpentaria in northern Australia. Every year many glider pilots keen to ride these special clouds head to the settlement of Burketown.Bing: search for more about Morning Glory cloudstopNatural wonders of the earth 2013Morning Glory clouds(©Getty )Morning Glory clouds(©Getty )Morning Glory clouds(©Getty )Morning Glory clouds(©Getty )Morning Glory clouds(©Getty )Morning Glory clouds(©Getty )Morning Glory clouds(©Getty )Morning Glory clouds(©Getty )Morning Glory clouds(©Getty )Morning Glory clouds(©Getty )Morning Glory clouds(©Getty )Morning Glory clouds(©Getty )Morning Glory clouds(©Getty )Morning Glory clouds(©Getty )Morning Glory clouds(©Getty )Morning Glory clouds(©Getty )Morning Glory clouds(©Getty )Morning Glory clouds(©Getty )Morning Glory clouds(©Getty )Morning Glory clouds(©Getty )Morning Glory clouds(©Getty )Morning Glory clouds(©Getty )Morning Glory clouds(©Getty )Morning Glory clouds(©Getty )Morning Glory clouds(©Getty )Morning Glory clouds(©Getty )Morning Glory clouds(©Getty )Morning Glory clouds(©Getty )Morning Glory clouds(©Getty )Morning Glory clouds(©Getty )Morning Glory clouds(©Getty )Morning Glory clouds(©Getty )Morning Glory clouds(©Getty )Morning Glory clouds(©Getty )Morning Glory clouds(©Getty )Morning Glory clouds(©Getty )Morning Glory clouds(©Getty )Morning Glory clouds(©Getty )Morning Glory clouds(©Getty )Morning Glory clouds(©Getty )Morning Glory clouds(©Getty )Morning Glory clouds(©Getty )Morning Glory clouds(©Getty )Morning Glory clouds(©Getty )Morning Glory clouds(©Getty )Morning Glory clouds(©Getty )Morning Glory clouds(©Getty )Morning Glory clouds(©Getty )Morning Glory clouds(©Getty )Morning Glory clouds(©Getty )Morning Glory clouds(©Getty )Morning Glory clouds(©Getty )Raining fishWhat is it? Though it is unlikely to ever literally rain cats and dogs, heavy downpours involving fish, frogs and other small water animals have been reported for centuries. Though the scientific evidence remains sketchy, the most common explanation of the phenomenon is waterspouts – small tornadoes powerful enough to lift tiny animals from their watery homes before depositing them somewhere else.Where can I see it? Lluvia de peces (the rain of fish) is such a regular occurrence in Honduras that the town of Yoro created a special annual festival in 1998 to celebrate the unusual phenomenon. The Festival de la Lluvia de Peces takes place every year in May or June when live fish are found flopping about on the town’s streets following a heavy storm.topNatural wonders of the earth 2013Raining fish(©Michael Thirnbeck)Raining fish(©Michael Thirnbeck)Raining fish(©Michael Thirnbeck)Raining fish(©Michael Thirnbeck)Raining fish(©Michael Thirnbeck)Raining fish(©Michael Thirnbeck)Raining fish(©Michael Thirnbeck)Raining fish(©Michael Thirnbeck)Raining fish(©Michael Thirnbeck)Raining fish(©Michael Thirnbeck)Raining fish(©Michael Thirnbeck)Raining fish(©Michael Thirnbeck)Raining fish(©Michael Thirnbeck)Raining fish(©Michael Thirnbeck)Raining fish(©Michael Thirnbeck)Raining fish(©Michael Thirnbeck)Raining fish(©Michael Thirnbeck)Raining fish(©Michael Thirnbeck)Raining fish(©Michael Thirnbeck)Raining fish(©Michael Thirnbeck)Raining fish(©Michael Thirnbeck)Raining fish(©Michael Thirnbeck)Raining fish(©Michael Thirnbeck)Raining fish(©Michael Thirnbeck)Raining fish(©Michael Thirnbeck)Raining fish(©Michael Thirnbeck)Raining fish(©Michael Thirnbeck)Raining fish(©Michael Thirnbeck)Raining fish(©Michael Thirnbeck)Raining fish(©Michael Thirnbeck)Raining fish(©Michael Thirnbeck)Raining fish(©Michael Thirnbeck)Raining fish(©Michael Thirnbeck)Raining fish(©Michael Thirnbeck)Raining fish(©Michael Thirnbeck)Raining fish(©Michael Thirnbeck)Raining fish(©Michael Thirnbeck)Raining fish(©Michael Thirnbeck)Raining fish(©Michael Thirnbeck)Raining fish(©Michael Thirnbeck)Raining fish(©Michael Thirnbeck)Raining fish(©Michael Thirnbeck)Raining fish(©Michael Thirnbeck)Raining fish(©Michael Thirnbeck)Raining fish(©Michael Thirnbeck)Raining fish(©Michael Thirnbeck)Raining fish(©Michael Thirnbeck)Raining fish(©Michael Thirnbeck)Raining fish(©Michael Thirnbeck)Raining fish(©Michael Thirnbeck)Raining fish(©Michael Thirnbeck)Raining fish(©Michael Thirnbeck)Moeraki bouldersWhat is it? Unlike the boulders on most beaches, the Moeraki boulders on New Zealand’s Koekohe Beach have not been rounded by centuries of erosion. Instead they grew to their massive size over the course of several millennia in a process not dissimilar to how pearls are formed. Created by layer upon layer of sediment which are in turn cemented by calcite, the largest of these oversized spherical stones measure in at over 8ft in diameter.Where can I see it? The Moeraki boulders are scattered along the rugged coastline of New Zealand between Moeraki and Hampden and are protected in a scientific reserve. Similar cannonball-like boulders known as Katiki boulders can be found near Shag Point, 12 miles south the Moeraki boulders.Bing: search for Moeraki boulderstopNatural wonders of the earth 2013Moeraki boulders(©Rex Features)Moeraki boulders(©Rex Features)Moeraki boulders(©Rex Features)Moeraki boulders(©Rex Features)Moeraki boulders(©Rex Features)Moeraki boulders(©Rex Features)Moeraki boulders(©Rex Features)Moeraki boulders(©Rex Features)Moeraki boulders(©Rex Features)Moeraki boulders(©Rex Features)Moeraki boulders(©Rex Features)Moeraki boulders(©Rex Features)Moeraki boulders(©Rex Features)Moeraki boulders(©Rex Features)Moeraki boulders(©Rex Features)Moeraki boulders(©Rex Features)Moeraki boulders(©Rex Features)Moeraki boulders(©Rex Features)Moeraki boulders(©Rex Features)Moeraki boulders(©Rex Features)Moeraki boulders(©Rex Features)Moeraki boulders(©Rex Features)Moeraki boulders(©Rex Features)Moeraki boulders(©Rex Features)Moeraki boulders(©Rex Features)Moeraki boulders(©Rex Features)Moeraki boulders(©Rex Features)Moeraki boulders(©Rex Features)Moeraki boulders(©Rex Features)Moeraki boulders(©Rex Features)Moeraki boulders(©Rex Features)Moeraki boulders(©Rex Features)Moeraki boulders(©Rex Features)Moeraki boulders(©Rex Features)Moeraki boulders(©Rex Features)Moeraki boulders(©Rex Features)Moeraki boulders(©Rex Features)Moeraki boulders(©Rex Features)Moeraki boulders(©Rex Features)Moeraki boulders(©Rex Features)Moeraki boulders(©Rex Features)Moeraki boulders(©Rex Features)Moeraki boulders(©Rex Features)Moeraki boulders(©Rex Features)Moeraki boulders(©Rex Features)Moeraki boulders(©Rex Features)Moeraki boulders(©Rex Features)Moeraki boulders(©Rex Features)Moeraki boulders(©Rex Features)Moeraki boulders(©Rex Features)Moeraki boulders(©Rex Features)Moeraki boulders(©Rex Features)Wildebeest migrationWhat is it? Undoubtedly one of nature’s most impressive spectacles and the inspiration behind many nature documentaries, the great migration of wildebeest across the plains of the Serengeti in East Africa sees some two million antelope making a round trip which covers over 2,000 miles. Nearly a tenth of the animals don’t complete this journey in search of food and water, as they fall prey to predators or die from exhaustion.Where can I see it? The exact timing of the migration depends entirely on rainfall patterns, but in autumn (April) the herd starts to migrate in a clockwise direction towards the Serengeti in Tanzania and the Maasai Mara in Kenya before returning to the short-grass plains of the southern Serengeti in spring to calf.Bing: stunning images of the wildebeest migrationtopNatural wonders of the earth 2013Wildebeest migrationWildebeest migrationWildebeest migrationWildebeest migrationWildebeest migrationWildebeest migrationWildebeest migrationWildebeest migrationWildebeest migrationWildebeest migrationWildebeest migrationWildebeest migrationWildebeest migrationWildebeest migrationWildebeest migrationWildebeest migrationWildebeest migrationWildebeest migrationWildebeest migrationWildebeest migrationWildebeest migrationWildebeest migrationWildebeest migrationWildebeest migrationWildebeest migrationWildebeest migrationWildebeest migrationWildebeest migrationWildebeest migrationWildebeest migrationWildebeest migrationWildebeest migrationWildebeest migrationWildebeest migrationWildebeest migrationWildebeest migrationWildebeest migrationWildebeest migrationWildebeest migrationWildebeest migrationWildebeest migrationWildebeest migrationWildebeest migrationWildebeest migrationWildebeest migrationWildebeest migrationWildebeest migrationWildebeest migrationWildebeest migrationWildebeest migrationWildebeest migrationWildebeest migrationSardine runWhat is it? Every year South Africa’s Kwazulu Natal coastline is turned into a feeding frenzy of epic proportions when the world’s biggest marine migration takes place. After spawning, massive shoals of sardines move northward along the east coast of the country. The massive size of the shoals (measuring up to four mile long and one mile wide) make them easy to spot from both air and land, and attract huge numbers of whale, dolphin, shark and birdlife.Where can I see it? The beaches along Kwazulu Natal’s coast are a hive of activity during the sardine run, with locals easily scooping the tiny fish from the shallow waters with nets and plastic containers of various sizes. Local radio stations run sardine spotting hotlines to keep the public up to date on the location of large shoals.Bing: stunning images of the sardine runtopNatural wonders of the earth 2013Sardine run(©Rex Features)Sardine run(©Rex Features)Sardine run(©Rex Features)Sardine run(©Rex Features)Sardine run(©Rex Features)Sardine run(©Rex Features)Sardine run(©Rex Features)Sardine run(©Rex Features)Sardine run(©Rex Features)Sardine run(©Rex Features)Sardine run(©Rex Features)Sardine run(©Rex Features)Sardine run(©Rex Features)Sardine run(©Rex Features)Sardine run(©Rex Features)Sardine run(©Rex Features)Sardine run(©Rex Features)Sardine run(©Rex Features)Sardine run(©Rex Features)Sardine run(©Rex Features)Sardine run(©Rex Features)Sardine run(©Rex Features)Sardine run(©Rex Features)Sardine run(©Rex Features)Sardine run(©Rex Features)Sardine run(©Rex Features)Sardine run(©Rex Features)Sardine run(©Rex Features)Sardine run(©Rex Features)Sardine run(©Rex Features)Sardine run(©Rex Features)Sardine run(©Rex Features)Sardine run(©Rex Features)Sardine run(©Rex Features)Sardine run(©Rex Features)Sardine run(©Rex Features)Sardine run(©Rex Features)Sardine run(©Rex Features)Sardine run(©Rex Features)Sardine run(©Rex Features)Sardine run(©Rex Features)Sardine run(©Rex Features)Sardine run(©Rex Features)Sardine run(©Rex Features)Sardine run(©Rex Features)Sardine run(©Rex Features)Sardine run(©Rex Features)Sardine run(©Rex Features)Sardine run(©Rex Features)Sardine run(©Rex Features)Sardine run(©Rex Features)Sardine run(©Rex Features)Old FaithfulWhat is it? It has been called the most predictable geographical feature on earth, erupting nearly every hour with a jet of scalding hot water. These eruptions can shoot as much as 30,000 litres of boiling hot water to heights of up to 185 feet, and can last for as long as five minutes. Since Old Faithful was first discovered in 1870, over 130,000 regular eruptions have been recorded.Where can I see it? Located in the Upper Geyser Basin of Yellowstone National Park in the US State of Wyoming, Old Faithful is the most famous of 300 geysers in the park, and attracts thousands of visitors every year.Bing: stunning images of Old FaithfultopNatural wonders of the earth 2013Old Faithful(©Rex Features)Old Faithful(©Rex Features)Old Faithful(©Rex Features)Old Faithful(©Rex Features)Old Faithful(©Rex Features)Old Faithful(©Rex Features)Old Faithful(©Rex Features)Old Faithful(©Rex Features)Old Faithful(©Rex Features)Old Faithful(©Rex Features)Old Faithful(©Rex Features)Old Faithful(©Rex Features)Old Faithful(©Rex Features)Old Faithful(©Rex Features)Old Faithful(©Rex Features)Old Faithful(©Rex Features)Old Faithful(©Rex Features)Old Faithful(©Rex Features)Old Faithful(©Rex Features)Old Faithful(©Rex Features)Old Faithful(©Rex Features)Old Faithful(©Rex Features)Old Faithful(©Rex Features)Old Faithful(©Rex Features)Old Faithful(©Rex Features)Old Faithful(©Rex Features)Old Faithful(©Rex Features)Old Faithful(©Rex Features)Old Faithful(©Rex Features)Old Faithful(©Rex Features)Old Faithful(©Rex Features)Old Faithful(©Rex Features)Old Faithful(©Rex Features)Old Faithful(©Rex Features)Old Faithful(©Rex Features)Old Faithful(©Rex Features)Old Faithful(©Rex Features)Old Faithful(©Rex Features)Old Faithful(©Rex Features)Old Faithful(©Rex Features)Old Faithful(©Rex Features)Old Faithful(©Rex Features)Old Faithful(©Rex Features)Old Faithful(©Rex Features)Old Faithful(©Rex Features)Old Faithful(©Rex Features)Old Faithful(©Rex Features)Old Faithful(©Rex Features)Old Faithful(©Rex Features)Old Faithful(©Rex Features)Old Faithful(©Rex Features)Old Faithful(©Rex Features)Black sunWhat is it? As the sun sets over the Danish marshlands in early spring, the skies turn dark when millions of European starlings take to flight. The size of the flocks are so immense that they seem to completely obscure the sun, giving rise to the term Sort Sol (black sun in Danish) which is used to describe the phenomenon.Where can I see it? The marshlands in south western Jutland is at the epicentre of the incredible spectacle, which occurs from March to mid-April. During the day the starlings gather food in the grasslands, forming the large aerial formations above the marshlands at sunset before heading to the reeds at night.Bing: search for more on 'black sun'topNatural wonders of the earth 2013Black sun(©Getty)Black sun(©Getty)Black sun(©Getty)Black sun(©Getty)Black sun(©Getty)Black sun(©Getty)Black sun(©Getty)Black sun(©Getty)Black sun(©Getty)Black sun(©Getty)Black sun(©Getty)Black sun(©Getty)Black sun(©Getty)Black sun(©Getty)Black sun(©Getty)Black sun(©Getty)Black sun(©Getty)Black sun(©Getty)Black sun(©Getty)Black sun(©Getty)Black sun(©Getty)Black sun(©Getty)Black sun(©Getty)Black sun(©Getty)Black sun(©Getty)Black sun(©Getty)Black sun(©Getty)Black sun(©Getty)Black sun(©Getty)Black sun(©Getty)Black sun(©Getty)Black sun(©Getty)Black sun(©Getty)Black sun(©Getty)Black sun(©Getty)Black sun(©Getty)Black sun(©Getty)Black sun(©Getty)Black sun(©Getty)Black sun(©Getty)Black sun(©Getty)Black sun(©Getty)Black sun(©Getty)Black sun(©Getty)Black sun(©Getty)Black sun(©Getty)Black sun(©Getty)Black sun(©Getty)Black sun(©Getty)Black sun(©Getty)Black sun(©Getty)Black sun(©Getty)Corryvreckan whirlpoolWhat is it? One of the largest whirlpools in the world, Corryvreckan holds an irresistible appeal for adventurous sailors and swimmers alike. Caused by water being squeezed at great force through a narrow gap in the Sound of Jura, Corryvreckan is actually not just one whirlpool, but rather a series of powerful vortices. At full strength the currents around the maelstrom can reach over 10mph and the crashing waves can be heard 10 miles away.Where can I see it? The Corryvreckan Whirlpool is located off the west coast of Scotland between the islands of Jura and Scarba, and can be reached by a number of tour boats which operate in the area.Bing: search for more on the Corryvreckan whirlpooltopNatural wonders of the earth 2013Corryvreckan whirlpool(©Wikimedia)Corryvreckan whirlpool(©Wikimedia)Corryvreckan whirlpool(©Wikimedia)Corryvreckan whirlpool(©Wikimedia)Corryvreckan whirlpool(©Wikimedia)Corryvreckan whirlpool(©Wikimedia)Corryvreckan whirlpool(©Wikimedia)Corryvreckan whirlpool(©Wikimedia)Corryvreckan whirlpool(©Wikimedia)Corryvreckan whirlpool(©Wikimedia)Corryvreckan whirlpool(©Wikimedia)Corryvreckan whirlpool(©Wikimedia)Corryvreckan whirlpool(©Wikimedia)Corryvreckan whirlpool(©Wikimedia)Corryvreckan whirlpool(©Wikimedia)Corryvreckan whirlpool(©Wikimedia)Corryvreckan whirlpool(©Wikimedia)Corryvreckan whirlpool(©Wikimedia)Corryvreckan whirlpool(©Wikimedia)Corryvreckan whirlpool(©Wikimedia)Corryvreckan whirlpool(©Wikimedia)Corryvreckan whirlpool(©Wikimedia)Corryvreckan whirlpool(©Wikimedia)Corryvreckan whirlpool(©Wikimedia)Corryvreckan whirlpool(©Wikimedia)Corryvreckan whirlpool(©Wikimedia)Corryvreckan whirlpool(©Wikimedia)Corryvreckan whirlpool(©Wikimedia)Corryvreckan whirlpool(©Wikimedia)Corryvreckan whirlpool(©Wikimedia)Corryvreckan whirlpool(©Wikimedia)Corryvreckan whirlpool(©Wikimedia)Corryvreckan whirlpool(©Wikimedia)Corryvreckan whirlpool(©Wikimedia)Corryvreckan whirlpool(©Wikimedia)Corryvreckan whirlpool(©Wikimedia)Corryvreckan whirlpool(©Wikimedia)Corryvreckan whirlpool(©Wikimedia)Corryvreckan whirlpool(©Wikimedia)Corryvreckan whirlpool(©Wikimedia)Corryvreckan whirlpool(©Wikimedia)Corryvreckan whirlpool(©Wikimedia)Corryvreckan whirlpool(©Wikimedia)Corryvreckan whirlpool(©Wikimedia)Corryvreckan whirlpool(©Wikimedia)Corryvreckan whirlpool(©Wikimedia)Corryvreckan whirlpool(©Wikimedia)Corryvreckan whirlpool(©Wikimedia)Corryvreckan whirlpool(©Wikimedia)Corryvreckan whirlpool(©Wikimedia)Corryvreckan whirlpool(©Wikimedia)Corryvreckan whirlpool(©Wikimedia)Naga fireballsWhat is it? Every year between 200 and 800 fiery orbs, ranging from small sparks to the size of basketballs, spontaneously explode from Thailand’s Mekong river before drifting off into the night sky. Known locally as bung fai paya nak (Naga Fireballs), locals believe the mysterious phenomenon is caused by the fiery breath of a mystical serpent. Some scientists ascribe it to pockets of methane gas bubbling up from the riverbed while others reckon it’s nothing more than an elaborate hoax.Where can I see it? The Naga Fireballs occur along a 150 mile stretch of the Mekong River during full moon at the end of Buddhist Lent in October. A dedicated festival in the town of Phon Phisai is at the heart of the activity, when thousands flock to the region to witness the fireballs.Bing: search for more on Naga FireballstopNatural wonders of the earth 2013Naga fireballs(©Benoit Michel)Naga fireballs(©Benoit Michel)Naga fireballs(©Benoit Michel)Naga fireballs(©Benoit Michel)Naga fireballs(©Benoit Michel)Naga fireballs(©Benoit Michel)Naga fireballs(©Benoit Michel)Naga fireballs(©Benoit Michel)Naga fireballs(©Benoit Michel)Naga fireballs(©Benoit Michel)Naga fireballs(©Benoit Michel)Naga fireballs(©Benoit Michel)Naga fireballs(©Benoit Michel)Naga fireballs(©Benoit Michel)Naga fireballs(©Benoit Michel)Naga fireballs(©Benoit Michel)Naga fireballs(©Benoit Michel)Naga fireballs(©Benoit Michel)Naga fireballs(©Benoit Michel)Naga fireballs(©Benoit Michel)Naga fireballs(©Benoit Michel)Naga fireballs(©Benoit Michel)Naga fireballs(©Benoit Michel)Naga fireballs(©Benoit Michel)Naga fireballs(©Benoit Michel)Naga fireballs(©Benoit Michel)Naga fireballs(©Benoit Michel)Naga fireballs(©Benoit Michel)Naga fireballs(©Benoit Michel)Naga fireballs(©Benoit Michel)Naga fireballs(©Benoit Michel)Naga fireballs(©Benoit Michel)Naga fireballs(©Benoit Michel)Naga fireballs(©Benoit Michel)Naga fireballs(©Benoit Michel)Naga fireballs(©Benoit Michel)Naga fireballs(©Benoit Michel)Naga fireballs(©Benoit Michel)Naga fireballs(©Benoit Michel)Naga fireballs(©Benoit Michel)Naga fireballs(©Benoit Michel)Naga fireballs(©Benoit Michel)Naga fireballs(©Benoit Michel)Naga fireballs(©Benoit Michel)Naga fireballs(©Benoit Michel)Naga fireballs(©Benoit Michel)Naga fireballs(©Benoit Michel)Naga fireballs(©Benoit Michel)Naga fireballs(©Benoit Michel)Naga fireballs(©Benoit Michel)Naga fireballs(©Benoit Michel)Naga fireballs(©Benoit Michel)

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