Updated: Wed, 18 Dec 2013 16:45:00 GMT | By Tamara Hinson
Intangible cultural heritage

Examples of Unesco’s intangible cultural heritage practices



Examples of Unesco’s intangible cultural heritage practices - 1 (© C Jnto)
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This week, the Japanese practice of washoku was added to the Unesco list of intangible cultural heritage. So what exactly is this list?

Unesco believes that cultural heritage isn’t just about geological marvels, collections of artefacts and historical ruins – it’s also about traditions, social practices and rituals inherited from ancestors and passed on to descendants. In 2003, Unesco set up a convention to help preserve these things.

Countries in which Unesco's intangible cultural heritage listings are located can apply to the convention for funds and assistance to help preserve the tradition or event in question. Here's a round-up of our favourites...

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Intangible cultural heritageExamples of Unesco’s intangible cultural heritage practices Examples of Unesco’s intangible cultural heritage practices Tamara Hinson2013-12-18T16:45:002013-12-18T16:45:00 trueExamples of Unesco’s intangible cultural heritage practices This week, the Japanese practice of washoku was added to the Unesco list of intangible cultural heritage. So what exactly is this list?Unesco believes that cultural heritage isn’t just about geological marvels, collections of artefacts and historical ruins – it’s also about traditions, social practices and rituals inherited from ancestors and passed on to descendants. In 2003, Unesco set up a convention to help preserve these things.Countries in which Unesco's intangible cultural heritage listings are located can apply to the convention for funds and assistance to help preserve the tradition or event in question. Here's a round-up of our favourites...topExamples of Unesco’s intangible cultural heritage practices - 1Examples of Unesco’s intangible cultural heritage practices  - 1(©C Jnto)Examples of Unesco’s intangible cultural heritage practices  - 1(©C Jnto)Examples of Unesco’s intangible cultural heritage practices  - 1(©C Jnto)Examples of Unesco’s intangible cultural heritage practices  - 1(©C Jnto)Examples of Unesco’s intangible cultural heritage practices  - 1(©C Jnto)Examples of Unesco’s intangible cultural heritage practices  - 1(©C Jnto)Examples of Unesco’s intangible cultural heritage practices  - 1(©C Jnto)Examples of Unesco’s intangible cultural heritage practices  - 1(©C Jnto)Examples of Unesco’s intangible cultural heritage practices  - 1(©C Jnto)Examples of Unesco’s intangible cultural heritage practices  - 1(©C Jnto)Examples of Unesco’s intangible cultural heritage practices  - 1(©C Jnto)Examples of Unesco’s intangible cultural heritage practices  - 1(©C Jnto)Examples of Unesco’s intangible cultural heritage practices  - 1(©C Jnto)Examples of Unesco’s intangible cultural heritage practices  - 1(©C Jnto)Examples of Unesco’s intangible cultural heritage practices  - 1(©C Jnto)Examples of Unesco’s intangible cultural heritage practices  - 1(©C Jnto)Examples of Unesco’s intangible cultural heritage practices  - 1(©C Jnto)Examples of Unesco’s intangible cultural heritage practices  - 1(©C Jnto)Examples of Unesco’s intangible cultural heritage practices  - 1(©C Jnto)Examples of Unesco’s intangible cultural heritage practices  - 1(©C Jnto)Examples of Unesco’s intangible cultural heritage practices  - 1(©C Jnto)Examples of Unesco’s intangible cultural heritage practices  - 1(©C Jnto)Examples of Unesco’s intangible cultural heritage practices  - 1(©C Jnto)Examples of Unesco’s intangible cultural heritage practices  - 1(©C Jnto)Examples of Unesco’s intangible cultural heritage practices  - 1(©C Jnto)Examples of Unesco’s intangible cultural heritage practices  - 1(©C Jnto)Examples of Unesco’s intangible cultural heritage practices  - 1(©C Jnto)Examples of Unesco’s intangible cultural heritage practices  - 1(©C Jnto)Examples of Unesco’s intangible cultural heritage practices  - 1(©C Jnto)Examples of Unesco’s intangible cultural heritage practices  - 1(©C Jnto)Examples of Unesco’s intangible cultural heritage practices  - 1(©C Jnto)Examples of Unesco’s intangible cultural heritage practices  - 1(©C Jnto)Examples of Unesco’s intangible cultural heritage practices  - 1(©C Jnto)Examples of Unesco’s intangible cultural heritage practices  - 1(©C Jnto)Examples of Unesco’s intangible cultural heritage practices  - 1(©C Jnto)Examples of Unesco’s intangible cultural heritage practices  - 1(©C Jnto)Examples of Unesco’s intangible cultural heritage practices  - 1(©C Jnto)Examples of Unesco’s intangible cultural heritage practices  - 1(©C Jnto)Examples of Unesco’s intangible cultural heritage practices  - 1(©C Jnto)Examples of Unesco’s intangible cultural heritage practices  - 1(©C Jnto)Examples of Unesco’s intangible cultural heritage practices  - 1(©C Jnto)Examples of Unesco’s intangible cultural heritage practices  - 1(©C Jnto)Examples of Unesco’s intangible cultural heritage practices  - 1(©C Jnto)Examples of Unesco’s intangible cultural heritage practices  - 1(©C Jnto)Examples of Unesco’s intangible cultural heritage practices  - 1(©C Jnto)Examples of Unesco’s intangible cultural heritage practices  - 1(©C Jnto)Examples of Unesco’s intangible cultural heritage practices  - 1(©C Jnto)Examples of Unesco’s intangible cultural heritage practices  - 1(©C Jnto)Examples of Unesco’s intangible cultural heritage practices  - 1(©C Jnto)Intangible cultural heritage: washoku, traditional dietary cultures of the Japanese, JapanWashoku, traditional dietary cultures of the Japanese, JapanWashoku, the latest addition to the list, is a social practice that relates to the preparation, processing and consumption of traditional Japanese food – but if you think it’s about how to hold your chopsticks, think again. It's most commonly practised during the new year, when the Japanese prepare to welcome the deities of the coming months.Dishes of fish, wild plants and rice are meticulously prepared and served on special tableware. The skills associated with washuko, which relate to the correct seasoning of food and recognition of the symbolic meanings of each dish, are passed down from generation to generation.On Bing: find out more about washukotopIntangible cultural heritage: washoku, traditional dietary cultures of the Japanese, Japan - 2Intangible cultural heritage: washoku, traditional dietary cultures of the Japanese, Japan - 2(©C Jnto)Intangible cultural heritage: washoku, traditional dietary cultures of the Japanese, Japan - 2(©C Jnto)Intangible cultural heritage: washoku, traditional dietary cultures of the Japanese, Japan - 2(©C Jnto)Intangible cultural heritage: washoku, traditional dietary cultures of the Japanese, Japan - 2(©C Jnto)Intangible cultural heritage: washoku, traditional dietary cultures of the Japanese, Japan - 2(©C Jnto)Intangible cultural heritage: washoku, traditional dietary cultures of the Japanese, Japan - 2(©C Jnto)Intangible cultural heritage: washoku, traditional dietary cultures of the Japanese, Japan - 2(©C Jnto)Intangible cultural heritage: washoku, traditional dietary cultures of the Japanese, Japan - 2(©C Jnto)Intangible cultural heritage: washoku, traditional dietary cultures of the Japanese, Japan - 2(©C Jnto)Intangible cultural heritage: washoku, traditional dietary cultures of the Japanese, Japan - 2(©C Jnto)Intangible cultural heritage: washoku, traditional dietary cultures of the Japanese, Japan - 2(©C Jnto)Intangible cultural heritage: washoku, traditional dietary cultures of the Japanese, Japan - 2(©C Jnto)Intangible cultural heritage: washoku, traditional dietary cultures of the Japanese, Japan - 2(©C Jnto)Intangible cultural heritage: opera dei pupi, Sicilian puppet theatre, ItalyOpera dei pupi, Sicilian puppet theatre, ItalyOpera dei pupi dates back to the start of the 19th century. Sicily's working classes would tell stories based on medieval chivalric literature and Italian poems from the Renaissance, and these tales would be illustrated by puppeteers.Sicily had two main puppet schools – one in Palermo and one in Catania – and the puppets produced by them were distinguishable by their size and shape. Traditional puppetry disappeared in the 1950s, but opera dei pupi performances can be still be enjoyed throughout Sicily.On Bing: find out more about Sicilian puppetrytopIntangible cultural heritage: opera dei pupi, Sicilian puppet theatre, Italy - 3Intangible cultural heritage: opera dei pupi, Sicilian puppet theatre, Italy - 3(©Italian Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: opera dei pupi, Sicilian puppet theatre, Italy - 3(©Italian Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: opera dei pupi, Sicilian puppet theatre, Italy - 3(©Italian Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: opera dei pupi, Sicilian puppet theatre, Italy - 3(©Italian Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: opera dei pupi, Sicilian puppet theatre, Italy - 3(©Italian Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: opera dei pupi, Sicilian puppet theatre, Italy - 3(©Italian Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: opera dei pupi, Sicilian puppet theatre, Italy - 3(©Italian Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: opera dei pupi, Sicilian puppet theatre, Italy - 3(©Italian Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: opera dei pupi, Sicilian puppet theatre, Italy - 3(©Italian Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: opera dei pupi, Sicilian puppet theatre, Italy - 3(©Italian Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: opera dei pupi, Sicilian puppet theatre, Italy - 3(©Italian Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: opera dei pupi, Sicilian puppet theatre, Italy - 3(©Italian Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: opera dei pupi, Sicilian puppet theatre, Italy - 3(©Italian Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: traditional weaving of the Ecuadorian toquilla straw hat, EcuadorTraditional weaving of the Ecuadorian toquilla straw hat, EcuadorYou might think this piece of headwear resembles a Panama hat but it’s actually very different. The toquilla hat is woven from a type of palm tree commonly found on the Ecuadorian coast. The leaves are boiled to remove the chlorophyll, before being bleached with sulphur over a wood-burning fire. The actual weaving can take up to eight months, and the men and women who make them mostly come from peasant families who have passed their knowledge down through the generations.On Bing: find out more about toquillo hatstopIntangible cultural heritage: traditional weaving of the Ecuadorian toquilla straw hat, Ecuador - 4Intangible cultural heritage: traditional weaving of the Ecuadorian toquilla straw hat, Ecuador - 4(©Ministry of Tourism for Ecuador)Intangible cultural heritage: traditional weaving of the Ecuadorian toquilla straw hat, Ecuador - 4(©Ministry of Tourism for Ecuador)Intangible cultural heritage: traditional weaving of the Ecuadorian toquilla straw hat, Ecuador - 4(©Ministry of Tourism for Ecuador)Intangible cultural heritage: traditional weaving of the Ecuadorian toquilla straw hat, Ecuador - 4(©Ministry of Tourism for Ecuador)Intangible cultural heritage: traditional weaving of the Ecuadorian toquilla straw hat, Ecuador - 4(©Ministry of Tourism for Ecuador)Intangible cultural heritage: traditional weaving of the Ecuadorian toquilla straw hat, Ecuador - 4(©Ministry of Tourism for Ecuador)Intangible cultural heritage: traditional weaving of the Ecuadorian toquilla straw hat, Ecuador - 4(©Ministry of Tourism for Ecuador)Intangible cultural heritage: traditional weaving of the Ecuadorian toquilla straw hat, Ecuador - 4(©Ministry of Tourism for Ecuador)Intangible cultural heritage: traditional weaving of the Ecuadorian toquilla straw hat, Ecuador - 4(©Ministry of Tourism for Ecuador)Intangible cultural heritage: traditional weaving of the Ecuadorian toquilla straw hat, Ecuador - 4(©Ministry of Tourism for Ecuador)Intangible cultural heritage: traditional weaving of the Ecuadorian toquilla straw hat, Ecuador - 4(©Ministry of Tourism for Ecuador)Intangible cultural heritage: traditional weaving of the Ecuadorian toquilla straw hat, Ecuador - 4(©Ministry of Tourism for Ecuador)Intangible cultural heritage: traditional weaving of the Ecuadorian toquilla straw hat, Ecuador - 4(©Ministry of Tourism for Ecuador)Intangible cultural heritage: Mediterranean diet, Cyprus, Croatia, Spain, Greece, Italy, Morocco and PortugalMediterranean diet, Cyprus, Croatia, Spain, Greece, Italy, Morocco and PortugalNext time you splash an extra glug of olive oil onto your salad, give yourself a pat on the back, because by doing so you're helping to preserve one of Unesco's oldest listed intangible cultural heritage practices. The diet makes it onto the list because of the skills, knowledge, rituals and traditions associated with the production, preparation, processing and sharing of traditional Mediterranean food.Hospitality, neighbourliness, intercultural dialogue and creativity are key, and in rural areas, women in particular play an important role in the preservation of preparation techniques as well as the organisation of cultural events celebrating the Mediterranean diet.On Bing: Mediterranean diet recipestopIntangible cultural heritage: Mediterranean diet, Cyprus, Croatia, Spain, Greece, Italy, Morocco and Portugal - 5Intangible cultural heritage: Mediterranean diet, Cyprus, Croatia, Spain, Greece, Italy, Morocco and Portugal - 5(©lotusuk.co.uk)Intangible cultural heritage: Mediterranean diet, Cyprus, Croatia, Spain, Greece, Italy, Morocco and Portugal - 5(©lotusuk.co.uk)Intangible cultural heritage: Mediterranean diet, Cyprus, Croatia, Spain, Greece, Italy, Morocco and Portugal - 5(©lotusuk.co.uk)Intangible cultural heritage: Mediterranean diet, Cyprus, Croatia, Spain, Greece, Italy, Morocco and Portugal - 5(©lotusuk.co.uk)Intangible cultural heritage: Mediterranean diet, Cyprus, Croatia, Spain, Greece, Italy, Morocco and Portugal - 5(©lotusuk.co.uk)Intangible cultural heritage: Mediterranean diet, Cyprus, Croatia, Spain, Greece, Italy, Morocco and Portugal - 5(©lotusuk.co.uk)Intangible cultural heritage: Mediterranean diet, Cyprus, Croatia, Spain, Greece, Italy, Morocco and Portugal - 5(©lotusuk.co.uk)Intangible cultural heritage: Mediterranean diet, Cyprus, Croatia, Spain, Greece, Italy, Morocco and Portugal - 5(©lotusuk.co.uk)Intangible cultural heritage: Mediterranean diet, Cyprus, Croatia, Spain, Greece, Italy, Morocco and Portugal - 5(©lotusuk.co.uk)Intangible cultural heritage: Mediterranean diet, Cyprus, Croatia, Spain, Greece, Italy, Morocco and Portugal - 5(©lotusuk.co.uk)Intangible cultural heritage: Mediterranean diet, Cyprus, Croatia, Spain, Greece, Italy, Morocco and Portugal - 5(©lotusuk.co.uk)Intangible cultural heritage: Mediterranean diet, Cyprus, Croatia, Spain, Greece, Italy, Morocco and Portugal - 5(©lotusuk.co.uk)Intangible cultural heritage: Mediterranean diet, Cyprus, Croatia, Spain, Greece, Italy, Morocco and Portugal - 5(©lotusuk.co.uk)Intangible cultural heritage: Kimjang, making and sharing kimchi, Republic of KoreaKimjang, making and sharing kimchi, Republic of KoreaKimchi is the name for preserved Korean vegetables seasoned with spices and mixed with fermented seafood. The practice of kimjang – the preparation of kimchi – is seen as way of reinforcing family ties and takes place throughout the year. Households work together to catch seafood in the spring, buy salt for the brine in early summer, pick chilli peppers in late summer, and finish making the kimchi in the autumn.Entire communities work together to prepare huge quantities to sustain themselves through the long, harsh Korean winters and the skills are passed on from mother-in-law to daughter-in-law.On Bing: find out how to make kimchitopIntangible cultural heritage: Kimjang, making and sharing kimchi, Republic of Korea - 6Intangible cultural heritage: Kimjang, making and sharing kimchi, Republic of Korea - 6(©Korea Tourism Organisation)Intangible cultural heritage: Kimjang, making and sharing kimchi, Republic of Korea - 6(©Korea Tourism Organisation)Intangible cultural heritage: Kimjang, making and sharing kimchi, Republic of Korea - 6(©Korea Tourism Organisation)Intangible cultural heritage: Kimjang, making and sharing kimchi, Republic of Korea - 6(©Korea Tourism Organisation)Intangible cultural heritage: Kimjang, making and sharing kimchi, Republic of Korea - 6(©Korea Tourism Organisation)Intangible cultural heritage: Kimjang, making and sharing kimchi, Republic of Korea - 6(©Korea Tourism Organisation)Intangible cultural heritage: Kimjang, making and sharing kimchi, Republic of Korea - 6(©Korea Tourism Organisation)Intangible cultural heritage: Kimjang, making and sharing kimchi, Republic of Korea - 6(©Korea Tourism Organisation)Intangible cultural heritage: Kimjang, making and sharing kimchi, Republic of Korea - 6(©Korea Tourism Organisation)Intangible cultural heritage: Kimjang, making and sharing kimchi, Republic of Korea - 6(©Korea Tourism Organisation)Intangible cultural heritage: Kimjang, making and sharing kimchi, Republic of Korea - 6(©Korea Tourism Organisation)Intangible cultural heritage: Kimjang, making and sharing kimchi, Republic of Korea - 6(©Korea Tourism Organisation)Intangible cultural heritage: Kimjang, making and sharing kimchi, Republic of Korea - 6(©Korea Tourism Organisation)Intangible cultural heritage: Carnival of Binche, BelgiumCarnival of Binche, BelgiumThis carnival is held in the town of Binche and takes place during the three days before Lent. Its roots date back to the middle ages and it's one of Europe's oldest festivals. Preparations begin in January, when Binche’s residents take part in drum rehearsals and start making elaborate costumes.Revellers (perhaps most notably men wearing masks and dressed in elaborate women's clothing, who are known as Mam’selles) take to the streets on Shrove Tuesday, and on Mardi Gras, the festival’s final day, harlequins join a procession that finishes with a spectacular firework display in the town’s Grande Place.On Bing: find out more about the Binche CarnivaltopIntangible cultural heritage: Carnival of Binche, Belgium - 7Intangible cultural heritage: Carnival of Binche, Belgium - 7(©Alex Kouprianoff)Intangible cultural heritage: Carnival of Binche, Belgium - 7(©Alex Kouprianoff)Intangible cultural heritage: Carnival of Binche, Belgium - 7(©Alex Kouprianoff)Intangible cultural heritage: Carnival of Binche, Belgium - 7(©Alex Kouprianoff)Intangible cultural heritage: Carnival of Binche, Belgium - 7(©Alex Kouprianoff)Intangible cultural heritage: Carnival of Binche, Belgium - 7(©Alex Kouprianoff)Intangible cultural heritage: Carnival of Binche, Belgium - 7(©Alex Kouprianoff)Intangible cultural heritage: Carnival of Binche, Belgium - 7(©Alex Kouprianoff)Intangible cultural heritage: Carnival of Binche, Belgium - 7(©Alex Kouprianoff)Intangible cultural heritage: Carnival of Binche, Belgium - 7(©Alex Kouprianoff)Intangible cultural heritage: Carnival of Binche, Belgium - 7(©Alex Kouprianoff)Intangible cultural heritage: Carnival of Binche, Belgium - 7(©Alex Kouprianoff)Intangible cultural heritage: Carnival of Binche, Belgium - 7(©Alex Kouprianoff)Intangible cultural heritage: Indonesian batik, Indonesia Indonesian batik, IndonesiaIndonesians love batik. They love making it, they love wearing it and they especially love putting their children in it – more specifically, lovingly crafted swathes of batik covered in symbols designed to bestow good luck upon the baby in question.Batik garments, which are made by drawing designs on fabric using dots and lines of hot wax, play a crucial role at weddings, births and funerals, and are also incorporated into the Indonesian art of puppet theatre. The symbols used reflect an enormous range of influences, and include Arabic calligraphy, Chinese phoenixes, Japanese cherry blossoms and Persian peacocks.On Bing: find out more about Indonesian BatiktopIntangible cultural heritage: Indonesian batik, Indonesia - 8Intangible cultural heritage: Indonesian batik, Indonesia  - 8(©Sarah Habicht)Intangible cultural heritage: Indonesian batik, Indonesia  - 8(©Sarah Habicht)Intangible cultural heritage: Indonesian batik, Indonesia  - 8(©Sarah Habicht)Intangible cultural heritage: Indonesian batik, Indonesia  - 8(©Sarah Habicht)Intangible cultural heritage: Indonesian batik, Indonesia  - 8(©Sarah Habicht)Intangible cultural heritage: Indonesian batik, Indonesia  - 8(©Sarah Habicht)Intangible cultural heritage: Indonesian batik, Indonesia  - 8(©Sarah Habicht)Intangible cultural heritage: Indonesian batik, Indonesia  - 8(©Sarah Habicht)Intangible cultural heritage: Indonesian batik, Indonesia  - 8(©Sarah Habicht)Intangible cultural heritage: Indonesian batik, Indonesia  - 8(©Sarah Habicht)Intangible cultural heritage: Indonesian batik, Indonesia  - 8(©Sarah Habicht)Intangible cultural heritage: Indonesian batik, Indonesia  - 8(©Sarah Habicht)Intangible cultural heritage: Indonesian batik, Indonesia  - 8(©Sarah Habicht)Intangible cultural heritage: shrimp fishing on horseback in Oostduinkerke, BelgiumShrimp fishing on horseback in Oostduinkerke, BelgiumIn Oostduinkerke, on the Belgian coast, a system of horses and nets has been used to catch shrimps for hundreds of years. A chain is dragged over the sand to create vibrations, which causes the shrimps (or at least those with a death wish) to jump up into nets pulled by the horses.Today, only 12 households in Oostduinkerke are actively engaged in this traditional method of fishing, but it’s an art form that unites the community: there’s an annual shrimp festival and a shrimp parade that attracts over 10,000 visitors every year.On Bing: find out more about Belgian shrimp fishingtopIntangible cultural heritage: shrimp fishing on horseback in Oostduinkerke, Belgium - 9Intangible cultural heritage: shrimp fishing on horseback in Oostduinkerke, Belgium - 9(©visitflanders.co.uk)Intangible cultural heritage: shrimp fishing on horseback in Oostduinkerke, Belgium - 9(©visitflanders.co.uk)Intangible cultural heritage: shrimp fishing on horseback in Oostduinkerke, Belgium - 9(©visitflanders.co.uk)Intangible cultural heritage: shrimp fishing on horseback in Oostduinkerke, Belgium - 9(©visitflanders.co.uk)Intangible cultural heritage: shrimp fishing on horseback in Oostduinkerke, Belgium - 9(©visitflanders.co.uk)Intangible cultural heritage: shrimp fishing on horseback in Oostduinkerke, Belgium - 9(©visitflanders.co.uk)Intangible cultural heritage: shrimp fishing on horseback in Oostduinkerke, Belgium - 9(©visitflanders.co.uk)Intangible cultural heritage: shrimp fishing on horseback in Oostduinkerke, Belgium - 9(©visitflanders.co.uk)Intangible cultural heritage: shrimp fishing on horseback in Oostduinkerke, Belgium - 9(©visitflanders.co.uk)Intangible cultural heritage: shrimp fishing on horseback in Oostduinkerke, Belgium - 9(©visitflanders.co.uk)Intangible cultural heritage: shrimp fishing on horseback in Oostduinkerke, Belgium - 9(©visitflanders.co.uk)Intangible cultural heritage: shrimp fishing on horseback in Oostduinkerke, Belgium - 9(©visitflanders.co.uk)Intangible cultural heritage: shrimp fishing on horseback in Oostduinkerke, Belgium - 9(©visitflanders.co.uk)Intangible cultural heritage: Matyó folk art, HungaryMatyó folk art, HungaryThe beautiful, elaborate folk art created by the Roman Catholic Matyó community in and around Mezőkövesd in north-eastern Hungary is characterised by floral designs usually found on ornamental objects. The designs form an integral part of Matyó identity and can be seen embroidered onto the clothes of local people, who practise the skills involved as a communal activity and value the art form as a means of individual artistic expression and a way to strengthen bonds within their community.On Bing: find out more about Matyó folk arttopIntangible cultural heritage: Matyó folk art, Hungary - 10Intangible cultural heritage: Matyó folk art, Hungary - 10(©Hungarian Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: Matyó folk art, Hungary - 10(©Hungarian Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: Matyó folk art, Hungary - 10(©Hungarian Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: Matyó folk art, Hungary - 10(©Hungarian Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: Matyó folk art, Hungary - 10(©Hungarian Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: Matyó folk art, Hungary - 10(©Hungarian Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: Matyó folk art, Hungary - 10(©Hungarian Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: Matyó folk art, Hungary - 10(©Hungarian Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: Matyó folk art, Hungary - 10(©Hungarian Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: Matyó folk art, Hungary - 10(©Hungarian Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: Matyó folk art, Hungary - 10(©Hungarian Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: Matyó folk art, Hungary - 10(©Hungarian Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: Matyó folk art, Hungary - 10(©Hungarian Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: Schemenlaufen, the carnival of Imst, AustriaSchemenlaufen, the carnival of Imst, AustriaThe Schemenlaufen is the most important part of the Fasnacht festival, which is held in the Austrian city of Imst every four years on the Sunday before Lent. Masked performers wearing elaborate costumes dance through the city, performing a series of tightly choreographed leaps and bows, while bells attached to their costumes provide the soundtrack.The whole city takes part in the celebrations: blacksmiths forge the bells, children carve the wooden masks worn by performers and local women make the costumes.On Bing: find out more about the carnival of ImsttopIntangible cultural heritage: Schemenlaufen, the carnival of Imst, Austria - 11Intangible cultural heritage: Schemenlaufen, the carnival of Imst, Austria - 11(©Austrian Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: Schemenlaufen, the carnival of Imst, Austria - 11(©Austrian Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: Schemenlaufen, the carnival of Imst, Austria - 11(©Austrian Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: Schemenlaufen, the carnival of Imst, Austria - 11(©Austrian Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: Schemenlaufen, the carnival of Imst, Austria - 11(©Austrian Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: Schemenlaufen, the carnival of Imst, Austria - 11(©Austrian Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: Schemenlaufen, the carnival of Imst, Austria - 11(©Austrian Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: Schemenlaufen, the carnival of Imst, Austria - 11(©Austrian Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: Schemenlaufen, the carnival of Imst, Austria - 11(©Austrian Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: Schemenlaufen, the carnival of Imst, Austria - 11(©Austrian Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: Schemenlaufen, the carnival of Imst, Austria - 11(©Austrian Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: Schemenlaufen, the carnival of Imst, Austria - 11(©Austrian Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: Schemenlaufen, the carnival of Imst, Austria - 11(©Austrian Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: Baltic song and dance celebrations, Estonia, Latvia and LithuaniaBaltic song and dance celebrations, Estonia, Latvia and LithuaniaBaltic song is an incredibly important form of cultural expression in Baltic countries – especially Estonia, where choirs and musical ensembles first became institutionalised during the 18th century. Once the Baltic states gained independence from Russia after the first world war, the celebrations acquired widespread popularity and became a means of asserting Baltic cultural identity.Large song and dance festivals are held every four years in Lithuania and every five in Estonia and Latvia. The performances are directed by professional choir conductors and each celebration involves up to 40,000 people.On Bing: find out more about Baltic song and dancetopIntangible cultural heritage: Baltic song and dance celebrations, Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania - 12Intangible cultural heritage: Baltic song and dance celebrations, Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania - 12(©Estonian Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: Baltic song and dance celebrations, Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania - 12(©Estonian Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: Baltic song and dance celebrations, Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania - 12(©Estonian Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: Baltic song and dance celebrations, Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania - 12(©Estonian Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: Baltic song and dance celebrations, Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania - 12(©Estonian Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: Baltic song and dance celebrations, Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania - 12(©Estonian Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: Baltic song and dance celebrations, Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania - 12(©Estonian Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: Baltic song and dance celebrations, Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania - 12(©Estonian Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: Baltic song and dance celebrations, Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania - 12(©Estonian Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: Baltic song and dance celebrations, Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania - 12(©Estonian Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: Baltic song and dance celebrations, Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania - 12(©Estonian Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: Baltic song and dance celebrations, Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania - 12(©Estonian Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: Baltic song and dance celebrations, Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania - 12(©Estonian Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: language, dance and music of the Garifuna in Belize, Guatemala, Honduras and NicaraguaLanguage, dance and music of the Garifuna in Belize, Guatemala, Honduras and NicaraguaThe Garifuna people settled along the Atlantic coast of Central America after fleeing from the Caribbean island of St Vincent in the 18th century. Their language has remained largely unchanged for hundreds of years and the traditional knowledge of cassava-growing, fishing and canoe-building has been passed down through generations, often at large gatherings during which úraga, or stories, are told to a soundtrack of beating drums.On Bing: find out more about the Garifuna peopletopIntangible cultural heritage: language, dance and music of the Garifuna in Belize, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua - 13Intangible cultural heritage: language, dance and music of the Garifuna in Belize, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua - 13(©latinamarketing.com)Intangible cultural heritage: language, dance and music of the Garifuna in Belize, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua - 13(©latinamarketing.com)Intangible cultural heritage: language, dance and music of the Garifuna in Belize, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua - 13(©latinamarketing.com)Intangible cultural heritage: language, dance and music of the Garifuna in Belize, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua - 13(©latinamarketing.com)Intangible cultural heritage: language, dance and music of the Garifuna in Belize, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua - 13(©latinamarketing.com)Intangible cultural heritage: language, dance and music of the Garifuna in Belize, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua - 13(©latinamarketing.com)Intangible cultural heritage: language, dance and music of the Garifuna in Belize, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua - 13(©latinamarketing.com)Intangible cultural heritage: language, dance and music of the Garifuna in Belize, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua - 13(©latinamarketing.com)Intangible cultural heritage: language, dance and music of the Garifuna in Belize, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua - 13(©latinamarketing.com)Intangible cultural heritage: language, dance and music of the Garifuna in Belize, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua - 13(©latinamarketing.com)Intangible cultural heritage: language, dance and music of the Garifuna in Belize, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua - 13(©latinamarketing.com)Intangible cultural heritage: language, dance and music of the Garifuna in Belize, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua - 13(©latinamarketing.com)Intangible cultural heritage: language, dance and music of the Garifuna in Belize, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua - 13(©latinamarketing.com)Intangible cultural heritage: fado, urban song of PortugalFado, urban song of PortugalFado might well be known as a form of urban song but that doesn’t mean there’s any twerking involved. It is actually a type of performance art that incorporates Afro-Brazilian dance, traditional Portuguese songs and various musical traditions from rural areas of Portugal.Singers are accompanied by traditional guitars and a guitarra – a pear-shaped cittern with 12 strings – and performances mainly take place in Lisbon’s oldest neighbourhoods in ‘fado houses'.On Bing: find out more about fadotopIntangible cultural heritage: fado, urban song of Portugal - 14Intangible cultural heritage: fado, urban song of Portugal - 14(©Portuguese Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: fado, urban song of Portugal - 14(©Portuguese Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: fado, urban song of Portugal - 14(©Portuguese Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: fado, urban song of Portugal - 14(©Portuguese Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: fado, urban song of Portugal - 14(©Portuguese Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: fado, urban song of Portugal - 14(©Portuguese Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: fado, urban song of Portugal - 14(©Portuguese Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: fado, urban song of Portugal - 14(©Portuguese Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: fado, urban song of Portugal - 14(©Portuguese Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: fado, urban song of Portugal - 14(©Portuguese Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: fado, urban song of Portugal - 14(©Portuguese Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: fado, urban song of Portugal - 14(©Portuguese Tourist Board)Intangible cultural heritage: fado, urban song of Portugal - 14(©Portuguese Tourist Board)

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